General November Weather

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spwill
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Re: General November Weather

Unread post by spwill »

Michael wrote:Humidity is a killer whenever the suns shining at the same time or it depends on what youre doing but if on holiday its no problem but imagine doing manual outdoor work in Darwin wonder how they cope?
Yes for me there is a difference between a good holiday climate and a good general living climate.
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NZstorm
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Re: General November Weather

Unread post by NZstorm »

Humidity is a killer whenever the suns shining at the same time or it depends on what youre doing but if on holiday its no problem but imagine doing manual outdoor work in Darwin wonder how they cope?
You would have to be a gorilla to work outside in Queensland or the NT.
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Re: General November Weather

Unread post by Thunder »

Tornado Tim wrote:Hey Aaron, what you can do to get the Radar Overlayed is copy the radar image url and make a new image overlay in google earth, paste the url image and position it where the radar is covering.
As for the soundings you posted (for Waikato), the GFS has upper atmosphere way too dry to support any storms.
You also might want to try some really good software written by Storm Chaser Tim Vasquez called "Digital Atmosphere" it can do pretty much any weather plotting you can throw at it.

Usually what happens in a storm situation is that upper air temps are dry anyway, but usually there is a mid point usually around 850 to 750mb where the updrafts take in moisture an heat and then saturate it and carry it further up (known as the LCL or Lifted Condensation Level) but yesterday it was atypical due to the storms not even hitting the tropopause.

You can usually get a very good indication of wether a storm has hit the tropopause or not by seeing what type of CB it is:

Cumulonimbus Incus:
DSCF2217.JPG
The Crown on top means the updraft in the cloud couldnt go any higher(due to a non favorable environment above) and instead spreads out.

As opposed to a Cumulonimbus Calvus: Pictured in this post, as it shows that it hasn't developed the "crown" or hasn't hit the tropopause yet.

Since that it didnt hit that height it seems that the optimum SFC temps and Dp's (around 18°C) caused a good enough lapse rate for lightning to occur.
Can finally get around to replying to this stuff.

Bugger me Tim, honestly didn't know too much about the fact you ideally want some resonable moisture between 850 and 750mb. Good to know though so thanks for that. From memory it's good to have a dry atmosphere in the mid to upper levels? (like 500mb and above correct?). I knew that much re to help in the formation for hail and such. In the forecasting days I was always more reluctant to put out a possibility of thunder unless it was dogs balls obvious that it looked like something would happen, something of which I'm yet to see here in Canterbury this summer. There's always a little chance here, little chance there but nothing really solid so far. I spose I'm a bit more excited again and that never helps. lol.

Thanks for the info re the radar and weather program, will definately look into it! \:D/

Aaron
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Aaron Wilkinson
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